DETROIT -- Sandy Alomar Jr. knows his name has come up in early speculation about the managerial situation facing the White Sox, but the Indians first-base coach has yet to receive a phone call from anyone in Chicago's front office.

If Alomar's phone does ring, he is willing to listen.

"I'm definitely interested, if anyone calls," Alomar said on Tuesday afternoon at Comerica Park. "But I don't want to elaborate on stuff like that, though. That's it. I have nothing else to say."

On Monday, the White Sox released Ozzie Guillen from his contract as manager of the ballclub, and it is expected that he will soon succeed Jack McKeon as manager of the Marlins. That leaves Chicago in the market for a new skipper, and Alomar is considered an early front-runner for the job.

Alomar, 44, resides in Chicago and spent parts of five seasons with the White Sox from 2001-06. The former All-Star catcher has never managed at any level, but he is widely respected around baseball for his baseball knowledge and personality.

Last winter, Alomar was on a short list for the managerial opening in Toronto, and Cleveland gave him permission to go through the interview process. After interviewing Alomar multiple times, the Blue Jays eventually hired John Farrell as their new manager.

Alomar said the situation with Toronto helped him a lot.

"Tremendously," he said. "[I learned] how interviews go about, the process of what they do. [They asked about] what kind of preparation you have and what kind of type of guy you are and how you would treat people and players. That's the bottom line. You learn so many things.

"How much you know the league and who you're going to compete against, and what you would do differently, that's the main thing they asked, but that's about all I'm going to give you."

Indians manager Manny Acta is hardly surprised that Alomar's name has now come up for more than one manager's position in the past two seasons.

"Sandy, even when he played, he showed that he had leadership skills," Acta said. "He's a guy who prepares himself very well and he's one of those guys that, not only was a very good player, but has shown a passion to coach. A lot of those guys just disappear into the sunset and go home.

"He has shown the passion of staying in the game. He's a good teacher and has a good personality. Some guys have been able to make the transition without managing in the Minor Leagues. It's not easy to do, but hey, you can't get experience until you get the job."

Alomar is in his second season as Cleveland's first-base coach. Prior to serving as a coach for the Indians -- a team he played for from 1990-2000 -- Alomar worked as a catching instructor for the New York Mets for two seasons. He played 20 years in the Majors with seven organizations.

Alomar emphasized that he is content in his current role with Cleveland.

"I'm happy with the Indians," he said. "I don't want to beat the Indians with the White Sox. I don't want to right now. I'm with the Indians. ... I really don't know what's going to happen here. All I know is that I'm here and hopefully we finish second.

"Then when I go home and relax with my family, if somebody calls me, then we'll talk. If jobs look for me, that's fine. I don't look for jobs."